Best places to eat in North Goa

Mini breakfast at Infantaria.
Image courtesy: Kavita Majumdar

Let’s face it, most of us go to Goa to indulge in some serious gluttony. The upside of visiting during the monsoon season is that you are not distracted by trivial things like watersports and night markets, and you get enough time to focus on the thing most important – FOOD!

Here are North Goa’s  the top spots for a happy belly:

Infantaria, Baga-Calangute junction: For a city-dweller like me, breakfast is a painful ritual that you have to hurriedly get done with and scoot-off to work, but breakfast at Infantaria truly makes it the most important, nay special, meals of the day. This Italian restaurant-cum-bakery is particularly famous for its great breakfast menu and homemade croissants and pastries. Try out the mini breakfast or the fluffy masala omelette and freshly brewed coffee.

Souza Lobo, Calangute: This is one of the oldest and most popular seafood restaurants in Calangute. Seafood lovers must try the divine grilled red snapper, baked crab or the king fish steak with parsley rice. Caution: you may go back feeling disappointed because you didn’t get to try it all! But never mind, you can ALWAYS go back the next day and sin some more.

The Goan favourite, Kingfish Xacuti.
Image courtesy: Lonely Planet Images

Britto’s, Baga: A trip to Goa is not complete without a visit to this Baga institution. This arena-sized shack offers yummy seafood, but what’s particularly special about this place is the massive list of drinks it has to offer. There is also a tattoo parlour and souvenir shop within its premises.

St Anthony’s, Baga: Located right next to Britto’s, St. Anthony’s has its own loyal following. Their seafood items are varied and can be cooked to order – fried in Goan spices, in a wine and mushroom sauce or in butter and garlic. The restaurant also serves delicious steaks and some north Indian dishes.

Casa Portuguesa, Baga: Housed in an ancestral Portuguese villa, this restaurant serves Goan influenced Portuguese food. Dishes include the likes of wild boar intestines.

View from Curlies.
Image courtesy: Kavita Majumdar

Curlie’s, Anjuna: Though this is primarily a nightclub, if you go during the day you can sit back and soak in the sea breeze while guzzling chilled beer accompanied with crunchy potato chips or fresh fried fish. They have a massive menu, so deciding what to pick may be difficult. We recommend the classic Goan curries like sorpotel and vindaloo or the seafood.

Thalassa, Vagator: The Greek taverna-style decor with lovely views of the sea, great food and service make Thalassa a great place to spend an evening. The menu has a selection of authentic Greek dishes such as tzatziki, moussaka and lamb gyros.

Fisherman’s Cove, Candolim: This little place on the Main Market road scores points primarily for its location. With a number of hotels on the road people looking for a quick bite usually land up here. They do serve a pretty decent steak and the fish and chips aren’t bad either.

House of Lloyds, Candolim: This place is not located by the beach, but offers some of the best home-cooked Goan food. Their pork chops are famous. It is open through the year.


With inputs from Lonely Planet India’s Goa travel guide.